How to Live Like A Traveler (Even When You Are Home)

How to live like a traveler (even when you are at home)
It can be really tough when you get that itch to travel, but circumstances prevent you from traveling too far or for very long.  A big year at work and our first year of having a mortgage to pay off mean that there hasn’t been much scope for overseas trips in the last 12 months, but I have developed some strategies to help keep myself sane and grounded when all I really want to do is take flight.  Here are some of the ways I help myself find that exhilarating and/or comforting feeling that travel always brings into my life.

Centre Yourself

Many mornings when I have to get up, shower and go to work, I try to visualise the excellent life place I was in when I was travelling solo for six months, back in 2013.  The physical place that represents my adventure mindset that I always end up returning is Whistler in Canada, because I was there in summer and the landscape, hiking and people I met were amazing.  I felt so free and grounded there.  Most mornings when I am in the shower, shampooing my hair etc, I imagine I am back in the shower of my dorm at the Whistler Hi Hostel.  This helps me start the day with the same peace and sense of wonder that I have when I am travelling.  Every day is an opportunity to recapture the person I was that summer.

Prepare Your Body for Future Travel

Traveling requires endurance, and we are often far more active when traveling than when at home.  Lately I experimented with being as active and adventurous in Sydney as I am when traveling, and found it really lifted my spirits.  I bought new active wear that I love so much I would wear it all day if I could, and started getting up at 6am at least 3 mornings a week to take the dog for a 7 km walk around Sydney Harbour near our house in Balmain.  I also started cycling 10 km to rock climbing twice a week and going for drives to the beach on weekends for an early morning swim.  Not only do I feel much more fit, strong and capable, I feel encouraged by the fact that I am living the same active life that I would be if I were off on a long adventure. Let’s just say that I have already started my training regime for a life of future travel.

Downsize Your Possessions

After having been home for a while, most of us tend to start to accumulate possessions again. While I love having shelves full of books, an ice cream maker, and at least three big fluffy petticoats for wearing under vintage dresses, I often feel overwhelmed by the amount of stuff that I have.  I often lie in bed at night doing an audit of my wardrobe, working out what would make the cut if I were to head off traveling, and what would stay behind.  I’m making a point at the moment of selling or getting rid of a lot of possessions that I just really don’t need in my life any more, and whenever I buy anything new I think about whether this is something that will help me in the future if I decide to live a more transient life.

Make the Most of Your Weekends

Even when you work full time, there are weekends (especially long weekends) when you can get out of the city and go somewhere different.  Even though it has been a very busy year without any overseas trips (NZ doesn’t count), I have been lucky enough to go on several short trips in the last year, including to Queenstown, Noosa, Melbourne, Mudgee, Brisbane, Tasmania, and the Hunter Valley.  Even if you can’t jump on a plane or drive for three hours, there are still plenty of ways to explore your own backyard.  Check out national parks near your home, cheap rental properties near the beach for the weekend, special excursions like walks or kayaking trips.  I especially like We Are Explorers, an Australian community of adventurers who curate awesome microadventures that you can go on close to home.

Travel in Your Own City

Even if we spend much of our time dreaming of far-off or exotic locations, most of us are actually not that great at spending time alone.  If you are thinking about traveling in the future, or just want to capture that magic travel feeling, try wandering your own city.  Pick a suburb you have never been to before and visit for the day, go to museums alone, take solo ferry journeys, take a book to a restaurant or cafe with good atmosphere and eat out alone, visit bookstores and art galleries.  Exploring your own city is a great way to revisit that sense of wonder you carry with you when you travel and gives you a chance to see your own home with fresh eyes.

Travel in Your Own Mind

Even if you can’t leave your home any time soon, there is no reason why you can’t expand your own experiences.  Read world literature, watch foreign films, and cook meals from other cultures.  Food is one of the most amazing things about traveling, and is something we savour and remember long after we have moved on to our next destination.  A great way to live like you are travelling is to eat food from the places you would like to go (or have been).  We love French and German Rieslings and have been thinking about going to Alsace for a long time.  We planned to spend a month in France in 2017, with part of that time spend in Alsace, but unfortunately (due to a number of circumstances) it looks like we may not make it in the next 12 moths.  But last night, to help myself imagine myself there, I cooked Coq au Riesling, and it was delicious.  You would be surprised how many ways there are to travel to a place you have never been, even when you are in your own living room.

If You Liked Westworld…

If you liked Westworld, try reading...

If you liked Westworld, try reading or watching...

If you are loving Westworld for its setting that on the surface seems historical and nostalgic, but is full of high level surveillance and subtle tinkering…  If you are enjoying Westworld for its portrayal of the gamification of both history and human experience, for the days that repeat endlessly, and the recursive moments and events that shield or ultimately expose glitches in the system, ghosts in the machine…  or if you are drawn in to the series for its constant questioning of what it means to be human, and how we measure our own humanity… you might like to try some of the following television, films and novels which explore similar themes.

Deadwood created by David Milch
Jurassic Park directed by Steven Spielberg
Bladerunner directed by Ridley Scott
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K Dick
Ex Machina directed by Alex Garland
Humans created by Sam Vincent and Jonathan Brackley
The Company Series by Kage Baker
Cabin in the Woods directed by Drew Goddard
The Truman Show directed by Peter Weir
The Peripheral by William Gibson
Reamde by Neal Stephenson
Edge of Tomorrow directed by Doug Liman
Firefly created by Joss Whedon

Book Review: Crosstalk by Connie Willis

Crosstalk by Connie Willis
(Publisher Advance Copy)

A great new geeky romantic novel by Connie Willis, Crosstalk will appeal to lovers of Jennifer Crusie, Rainbow Rowell and Graeme Simsion

Readers of Jennifer Crusie, Rainbow Rowell and Graeme Simsion will likely enjoy Crosstalk, the latest romantic novel from the queen of humorous and entertaining Science Fiction, Connie Willis.

Briddie Flannigan works for a mobile phone company working on a big new release to rival Apple’s latest offering.  Simultaneously, her boyfriend Trent pops a very millennial question, asking her to join him in undertaking a neurological procedure that will bring them closer by allowing them to directly feel one another’s emotions.  When things go slightly awry with the procedure, Briddie must reevaluate many aspects of both her life and modern life in general, guided by an unlikely support team: scruffy and quirky anti hero C.B. Schwartz, a colleague of hers at the mobile phone company; and her precocious 9-year old niece Maeve.

One thing that has always simultaneously delighted and perplexed me about Connie Willis is her ability to have her finger on the  social pulse, while often discounting or neglecting crucial technological developments.  The absence of a portable phone system in Willis’s 2050 Oxford in Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog is infuriating at times, but I also recognise that the grim chaos and confusion of Doomsday Book, and the extreme farce of To Say Nothing of the Dog couldn’t have happened without the plot device that the lack of mobile telephony enables.  Willis makes up for this technological oversight in Crosstalk by embracing the mobile phone trope, and ramping up connectivity to an unbearable level.  I don’t want to provide too many spoilers, but it is very fair to say that this is definitely a novel about connection fatigue.

And in the modern world, what better connection is there than love?  I have always adored Willis’s romantic subplots, as she has intelligent, self-possessed heroines and a gorgeous line of attractive anti-heroes.  Her romantic heroes are never alpha males, are often slightly bumbling and scruffy or socially inept, but reveal themselves to be sensitive, intelligent and have the kind of hidden depths and social intelligence you only encounter upon getting to know someone a little better.  Crosstalk explores not only connection fatigue, but also romance fatigue in general. In many ways, this is a romance novel for readers who are sick of or suspicious of romance.

Continue reading

Treat Yourself: Bedlinen

cultiver-sheets

After getting divorced in my late twenties, I lived alone for the first time. It was a quite roomy one bedroom house with a large living room, long corridor and large and very liveable kitchen. It was the entire downstairs of a Sydney terrace house and had a gorgeous garden out the back. I rented on Gumtree (Australia’s Craigslist) and it cost me a third of my salary each week. This was a luxury I decided I needed for a while, to help me find some peace and also test myself: to see if I could live alone and if I would enjoy it.

My new house came furnished and while there was a lot of stuff in the house… shabby antique furniture and over 100 vintage pictures hung on the walls, the bedroom was surprisingly minimal. It just had a plain double bed with no headboard, and a lamp that sent out a gentle, mellow light from a little bedside table. To personalise the bedroom and give myself a little luxury, I splashed out on a gorgeous quilt cover from Spacecraft. It made the room, and also helped me feel extremely happy going to bed each night alone. I loved that little house and discovered in my year there (among other, much more important things) that good bedlinen is a little luxury that can help you every day.

Whether it is a statement quilt cover, or buttery linen sheets, or a collection of mismatched vintage pillow cases, this is a gorgeous and practical way to treat yourself. We do spend a third of our life in bed, after all.

Best Cleansers for Oily Skin

Even in my thirties, my skin is still rather oily and I experience a lot of congestion. Especially after a long day at work or out and about in the city, I love few things more than cleansing my face and getting everything soft and smooth again. It can be hard to find a cleanser that really gets all the gunk out of your face, leaving pores clean, without making your face feel tight and shiny or dry and flakey.  Through trial and error (and lots of samples), I have found 5 that I love.

These are my favourite day and night cleansers for clean, soft skin.

Dermalogica Special Cleansing Gel
Deep cleansing, but very gentle on the skin. Used by lots of beauty therapists at the start of your facial or skin treatment. I often get travel sized bottles of this face wash in promotions from Adore Beauty, so it is often my travel cleanser of choice.

Alpha H Triple Action Cleanser with Thyme
A luxurious, beautiful smelling cleanser that leaves your skin feeling really clear. The liquid is quite thick and viscous but you don’t need much of it to get a great wash. Great for makeup removal, too. Leaves skin feeling clean, soft and balanced.

Dermalogica Clear Start Breakout Clearing Foaming Wash
Comes is a very generously sized tube and foams up really nicely. If you love a cleanser with lots of foam and bubbles, and want deep cleansing that doesn’t leave your skin tight this is a great choice. Especially good in summer when you wear a lot of sunscreen.

Dr Hauschka Cleansing Cream
More of a scrub than a cleanser, but this is a very gentle one that really cleans pores by massaging the skin in a way that gently removes deep dirt and impurities. Far less abrasive than other scrubs and helps control the skin’s natural oil production. Always leaves my skin glowing.

Neutrogena Deep Clean Facial Cleanser
By far the cheapest cleanser on this list, but currently my favourite! Leaves skin feeling perfectly clean and supple. My skin has really cleared up over the last few weeks while using this cleanser and I am really happy with it – especially the price! I love that it comes in a pump bottle.

Spring Style: Boho Minimalism

Spring Style Trend: Boho Luxe Minimalist

I never imagined that I would be a bohemian dresser. I wear little jewellery and generally like my clothes to be embellished with simple style lines or interesting and unusual construction methods.

Lately, though, I have been drawn to Toast, Isabel Marant Etoile, Ace & Jig, Steven Alan and Rachel Comey, and a few Australian Designers who do boho minimalism really well: Fleur Wood, Lee Mathews, Morrison and Tigerlily in particular.

And I just bought my first pair of dropped-crotch trousers… and can’t stop checking the instagram of Sincerely Jules and The Luxi Look

The fact that summer is coming, planning evening trips to the beach now the days are longer and warmer, and dreaming of tropical and sub-continent holidays has definitely helped, as has a growing obsession with Ikat fabrics and Kilim textiles.

Boho Minimalist Rules

But because I am a sartorial minimalist at heart I have a few style rules for myself to keep this new luxe desire for embellishment under control.

Play with texture
Keep the silhouette simple and add detail with special fabrics, but without being overly decorative. Think linen and silk, fabric manipulation like pintucks, lace inserts, embossed and textured woven fabrics and monochrome embroidery rather than all over lace, fringing or pom pom edging.

Careful with pattern
If the print is big or small, stick with just the one item of clothing made of out patterned fabric. This one pattern can compliment the textural differences of your other garments, without being over the top.

Play with proportion
Thinking about the silhouette again, don’t assume that everything has to be voluminous, a simple oversized shift or an a-line maxi skirt in a vintage fabric with good drape can work just as well as a frou frou ruffled off-the shoulder dress. Likewise, if you choose a simple style of camisole, shirt or dress, texture or simple embellishment can still make it feel luxe. Just because you are leaning towards the bohemian, doesn’t mean you can’t keep it sedate and elegant.

Keep your colour palette simple
Monochrome layers in taupe, grey, black, ecru, dusty pinks or white, contrasting navy and light neutrals, or one to two bright colours (at most) with a neutral background.  Indigo. More indigo.

Use vintage folk accents
Use vintage items wisely, by having a minimal and possibly even monochrome outfit, but with a vintage fair isle or lopi jumper, or a blouse with embroidered or lace insets.

Melbourne Day Trip: Macedon Ranges, VIC

Granite Hills Winery, Macedon Ranges

Just an hour from Melbourne, The Macedon Ranges offer a perfect out of town day trip.  Even in rainy September, this hilly rural area was on fine display with daffodils blooming everywhere as the towns and vineyards en route celebrated the coming of spring.

If you are planning on wine tasting, aim for a Friday or Saturday when more vineyards are open. On the Thursday we set out, there were 7 easily identifiable vineyards open for tastings, but they were spread out over a wide area and we had to plan our route.  Granite Hills in Baynton was our pick of the bunch with a smart cellar door, a welcoming host and an impressive range of fragrant and complex cool climate wines.

After hitting a few vineyards we stopped in trendy Kyneton for a late lunch.  The main drag Piper Street is full of edgy and interesting artisan clothing, antique, homeware and culinary stores housed in historic shopfronts (vintage homewares store Kabinett was particularly awesome). Right in the middle  of Piper Street is historic pub The Royal George Hotel, revisioned five years ago as a low key hipster mecca, complete with taxidermy, peeling wallpaper, a large range of craft beers.  The chilled out modern folk on the stereo on the day we were dining included Blitzen Trapper, Bright Eyes and Dana Falconberry.

It would be easy enough to head on from Kyneton to Daylesford and make a proper weekend of it, but as we had to return our rental car by 6pm, we headed off from Kyneton at about 4pm for an easy 60 minute drive back to the Melbourne CBD.  I’ve already started looking for Airbnb properties to rent for a weekend in the future, though.

Ate: Red Duck Curry and Mornington IPA at The Royal George Hotel
Explored: Macedon Vineyards, including Hanging Rock and Granite Hills
Region Highlights: Kyneton, Daylesford